Fishtown Mamas do their part to support a good cause

A group of Fishtown mothers active in the Fishtown Mamas Facebook group have designed pins to be sold at seven stores throughout Fishtown in an effort to benefit Prevention Point.

A group of Fishtown mothers active in the Fishtown Mamas Facebook group has designed pins to be sold at seven stores throughout Fishtown in an to benefit Prevention Point, an organization that defines itself as “a private nonprofit organization providing harm reduction services to Philadelphia and the surrounding area.” The organization works a lot with homeless opioid addicts in the River Wards region of Philadelphia.

“It all kind of started when another member of the Fishtown Mamas group had mentioned that she thought it would be such a great idea if we wore a pin to recognize each other,” said Fishtown Mamas co-founder Kim Geisler. “People really seemed to like that idea. It was also brought up that we could sell them and raise money for a charity.”

A few designs were made and the members of the Facebook group voted on their favorite. The winning design, which was created by Fishtown resident Sarah Brown, is being sold at the following seven Fishtown-based businesses: Minnow Lane, Play Arts, Friends and Nemesis Salon, Herringbone Salon, At Home Modern, Mother Heart Yoga Studio and Flip Out Productions.

“It’s been pretty popular so far already,” said Geisler, who said that the suggested donation for a pin is $5.

“I’ve heard a lot of wonderful things about what they do,” Geisler said referring to the group’s decision to pick Prevention Point as its charity to support. “This was a community decision within the entire group. This was the one that everyone felt was trying to make the biggest difference and had the best resources available to make the biggest difference in the city.”

She added: “[We] wanted to do something that helped to contribute [to the mitigation of] the heroin addiction problem that is plaguing this area and the city in general…I think it was because of the amount of people we’re seeing on the streets here that are facing an addiction in the community and it’s also affecting a lot of families.”

Geisler said they plan to sell the pins until the end of February. After that, the group is unsure of how it will proceed. One option, Geisler said, is to create a new design that benefits a different charity.